Internet Department

Potratz Releases Web Tool That Predicts Shopper Behavior

October 01, 2014

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. — Potratz, a digital marketing agency, announced this week it has developed a new tool to combat website abandonment on the part of shoppers. Called ExitGadget, the tool uses highly targeted pop-up messages to help dealers capture website leads.

ExitGadget predicts the behavior of the user by utilizing custom algorithms combined with device tracking technology to determine when that person is exhibiting signs of abandoning the page. It then delivers a customizable message with buttons and forms designed to convert website visitors into leads. The website owner is then able to collect more data about the individual before he or she leaves the page, preventing an otherwise lost lead.

The company cited a study from Chatbeat, a data analytics company, showed that 55% of visitors spend less than 15 seconds on a brand’s website, adding that even that window is narrowing more and more due to the amount of technological distractions available. It also quote a Google study that showed that 96% of people visiting a brand’s site leave before they take any action.

“We’re excited about ExitGadget. We’ve been using technology to bring people back to our site for years,” said Paul Potratz. “But this is the first time we’re able to say with certainty that we have a cure for bounced traffic.”

Potratz is a full-service automotive advertising agency specializing in digital marketing. The agency was founded in 2003 by Potratz. It has received a Dealer Satisfaction Award from Driving Sales for Search and Behavioral Marketing every year since the award’s inception.

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