Top News

Canadian Ford Dealer Goes Fully Digital

May 3, 2017

Koch Ford Lincoln in Edmonton, Alberta, has launched a new website designed to allow car buyers to find, reserve and purchase a vehicle.
Koch Ford Lincoln in Edmonton, Alberta, has launched a new website designed to allow car buyers to find, reserve and purchase a vehicle.

EDMONTON, Alberta, Canada — Alberta Koch Automotive Group has launched what is billed as Canada’s first ecommerce dealership. Using their innovative website to put convenience first, directors say, car buyers can reserve or purchase a vehicle without ever visiting the showroom.

The new website for Koch Ford Lincoln in Edmonton, Alberta, promises a 24/7 online experience that delivers the ultimate customer convenience on their terms. The platform allows consumers to casually browse inventory, chat with live operators, and reserve or purchase a vehicle, all from the convenience of their laptop.

Using the online “Reserve” option, consumers can reserve a vehicle with a refundable 1% deposit. Online deposits are risk-free and money-back guaranteed, according to the dealer, and allow consumers to book a test drive, negotiate pricing, go through all the terms, and address any potential questions or issues without purchasing the vehicle in full.

A “Purchase Vehicle” option directs consumers to use a major credit card or a PayPal account to complete their transaction. Consumers have the choice of paying the vehicle’s total online or speaking with a representative to complete the financial terms.

The Koch Auto Group will be rolling out the new ecommerce platform across their dealerships, starting with Koch Ford Lincoln in Edmonton and DK Ford in nearby Leduc.

Your Comment

Please note that comments may be moderated. 
Leave this field empty:
Your Name:  
Your Email:  

CLOSE [X]

READ NEXT

AutoNation’s Jackson: New Tech Could Hurt Used Cars

Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas engaged AutoNation Chairman and CEO Mike Jackson in a frank discussion about whether new safety technology could hasten the obsolescence of used units.